Description
Beginner | 35 min
In this class, Jesse gives a thorough lesson on how to print photographic images onto fabric using Inkodye – a light-sensitive fabric dye that develops into rich, permanent colors in the sun. She begins by explaining what kind of pictures will make a clean, crisp print, and then goes on to share several methods for turning a photograph into a negative image, including how to use the Lumi app to customize, and how to print your own negative transparencies at home on an inkjet printer. Once your negative has been created, Jesse carefully explains the steps for applying the Inkodye and exposing the shirt to sunlight to develop the color. Jesse also shares great ideas for altering the negative to achieve cool, unexpected effects. You’ll wind up with a crisp replication of the original photo and a negative you can use over and over again for printing.
Learn how to:
  • Apply Inkodye to fabric
  • Create photographic negatives
  • Alter negatives
  • Develop Inkodye in sunlight

What you’ll get:
  • An easy-to-follow class on how to print photographic images onto fabric using Inkodye
  • 6 HD video lessons you can access online anytime, anywhere
  • Detailed supply list
  • Step-by-step instruction by expert instructor and entrepreneur Jesse Genet of Lumi
  • The ability to leave comments, ask questions and interact with other students


Chapters
Introduction
00:33
Materials
02:15
Creating a Negative
03:23
04:23
Prepare Shirt for Printing
12:10
06:11
Pro Tips
06:50
Materials
Here’s what you’ll need:
Materials:
  • Lumi Photo Printing Kit
  • Photograph for printing
  • Inkofilm
  • Shirt made from a natural fiber
  • Painter’s tape
  • Paper towels
  • Pushpins
  • Scotch tape
If you don’t have the kit, you will need:
  • Lumi project board (or foam core)
  • 1-ounce Snap Packs of Inkodye in black/ plum/ blue
  • Two 1-ounce Inkowash Snap Packs
Discussion
Notes
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Transcript
Class Discussion
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